Virtualise ton prof…

Oh la belle provocation ! Et pour cause, les MOOC sont à l’honneur de ce billet. Les MOOC, quèsaco ? MOOC pour Massive Open Online Course, ce sont des cours diffusés en ligne gratuitement. Généralement, ils prennent la forme de vidéos explicatives mettant en scène un enseignant, quelques documents pdf, des bibliographies, des forums et des systèmes d’évaluation sous forme de quizz – et oui, on a numérisé le prof ! Mis à part la correction des copies qui s’est volatilisée, quels avantages trouve-t-on à ces nouvelles pratiques, me direz-vous ?

Ces cours sont accessibles à tous gratuitement, peu importe son niveau d’étude, et peuvent être suivis à toute heure de la journée. Pour une somme modique, il est possible d’obtenir une attestation de réussite à faire valoir sur son cv ou auprès de son employeur dans le cadre d’une évolution professionnelle – au même titre qu’une formation continue.

Evidemment – évidemment ! – ils ne remplacent pas un cursus universitaire et encore moins les échanges de vive voix avec un expert du domaine enseigné. Toutefois, ils permettent une première approche d’un sujet et peuvent être un point de départ non négligeable pour un nouveau projet dans le cadre d’une formation continue, ou pour une véritable reprise d’études dans d’autres cas.

Et pour les curieux simplement, les fonctionnalités interactives telles que les forums et les quizz – plutôt ludiques  – permettent d’engager un minimum d’investissement personnel  dans la prise de connaissance, voire la réflexion autour d’un sujet. Si le livre et la lecture sur un temps long  sont une base nécessaire au déploiement de la pensée – de l’étudiant comme de l’auteur, le MOOC permet de faire le point de ce que l’on en a retenu, et ouvre éventuellement les portes pour un échange plus soutenu avec d’autres étudiants et les enseignants qui voudront bien se plier à l’exercice.

A mi-chemin entre le livre et le cours en présentiel, le MOOC ne se substitue à aucun des deux. Dans certain cas, il est possible de l’envisager comme un documentaire vidéo en plusieurs épisodes, parfois en live, et enrichis de fonctionnalités interactives. Il peut éventuellement compléter un cours en présentiel.

Pour vous faire votre propre idée sur ce qui existe actuellement sur les domaines de compétences de la MOM, voici une « petite » sélection de MOOC qui pourraient vous intéresser. Pour un usage personnel, il en existe bien d’autres sur des sujets extrêmement variés de l’astronomie à la couture en passant par le développement d’une politique publique.

 Sommaire

 Sur les civilisations orientales

En cours depuis le 5 février 2018

This course focusses on how the Assyrians organised their empire by analysing key aspects, namely :

  • The CEO – the king, a religious, political and military leader, who is charged to govern by his master, the god Assur;
  • Home Office – the royal palace in the central region and the royal court that form the administrative centre of the state;
  • The Regional Managers – the governors and client-rulers to whom local power is delegated;
  • Human Resources – the Empire’s people are its most precious assets, its consumers and its key product, as the goal of the imperial project was to create “Assyrians”; an approach with lasting repercussions that still reverberate in the Middle East today; and finally
  • The Fruits of Empire – it takes a lot of effort, so what are the rewards? 

Commence le 19 février 2018

Which are the deepest roots of that mix of cultures that we use to call ‘Mediterranean Civilization’? Which are comminglings and exchanges which produced its most complete fruit, i.e. the city, a place for landscape-modelling communities? And which elements did contribute to build up that baulk of customs, ideas, and innovations which compelled to confrontation and hybridizations different peoples for millennia? What did it made, from pottery to metallurgy, from gastronomy to architecture, from art to religion, of a sea a cradle of civilization? Archaeology may help in disentangling such questions, seeking unexpected answers , by tinkering what ancient Mediterranean peoples left buried in the ground. A privileged point of view of our course is the ancient Phoenician city of Motya, located exactly at the centre of the “sea in the middle”. Throughout the live experience of excavation, with images taken on the field, this course will let you touch the many tesserae of the great mosaic of the Mediterranean Civilization. The field diary of the archaeologist, and the handpick will be the two tools, which will lead us across the sea to discover what such early cities actually were, and how their contribute is still a major part of our shared memory.

Ce cours est terminé mais le contenu reste accessible

Colossal pyramids, imposing temples, golden treasures, enigmatic hieroglyphs, powerful pharaohs, strange gods, and mysterious mummies are features of Ancient Egyptian culture that have fascinated people over the millennia. The Bible refers to its gods, rulers, and pyramids.
Neighboring cultures in the ancient Near East and Mediterranean wrote about its god-like kings and its seemingly endless supply of gold. The Greeks and Romans describe aspects of Egypt’s culture and history. As the 19th century began, the Napoleonic campaign in Egypt highlighted the wonders of this ancient land, and public interest soared. Not long after, Champollion deciphered Egypt’s hieroglyphs and paved the way for other scholars to reveal that Egyptian texts dealt with medicine, dentistry, veterinary practices, mathematics, literature, and accounting, and many other topics.
Then, early in the 20th century, Howard Carter discovered the tomb of Tutankhamun and its fabulous contents. Exhibitions of this treasure a few decades later resulted in the world’s first blockbuster, and its revival in the 21st century has kept interest alive. Join Dr. David Silverman, Professor of Egyptology at Penn, Curator in Charge of the Egyptian Section of the Penn Museum, and curator of the Tutankhamun exhibitions on a guided tour of the mysteries and wonders of this ancient land. He has developed this online course and set it in the galleries of the world famous Penn Museum. He uses many original Egyptian artifacts to illustrate his lectures as he guides students as they make their own discovery of this fascinating culture.

Sur le monde arabe

Inscription jusqu’au 26 mars 2018

Ce MOOC vous offre une initiation orale et écrite à la langue commune à tout le monde arabe, l’arabe littéral, et à un parler en usage dans le Proche-Orient et compris dans tout le monde arabe, le dialecte syro-libanais.

En cours depuis le 19 décembre 2017

You will study this course in two parts. The first presents the main political events that set the chronological framework for the course, namely 6th century to the arrival of the Ottomans in the Middle East in the beginning of the 16th century. The second part delves into social and cultural realities of the medieval Middle East.

Commence le 19 février 2018

This course will introduce you to various aspects of the Quran, including its basic message, the historical context in which it originated, the diverse ways in which Muslims have interpreted it, and its surprisingly intimate relationship with the Bible. By the end of the course, you will gain an appreciation for the perspectives of Muslim believers and academic scholars alike on the origins and the meaning of the Islamic scripture. No background in Islam or Arabic is necessary for this course.

Commence le 19 février 2018

How did the State of Israel come to be? How is it that an idea, introduced in 19th century Europe, became a reality? And how does that reality prevail in the harsh complexities of the Middle East?
Presented by Professor Eyal Naveh, with additional units from Professor Asher Sussers’ « The Emergence of the Modern Middle East » course, This course will take you on a journey through the history of Modern Israel. In this 1st part of the course we will explore:
How did the 19th century idea of a Jewish state become a reality?
So the next time you hear about Israel in the news, you will be informed enough about the history of this area to comprehend the many sides and narratives that interact to shape the complex reality of Israel today.

Commence le 12 février 2018

This course deals with the Israeli politics, economy, society and culture, since its creation in 1948 till today. It analyzes the construction of the Israeli historical narrative as an identity-building narrative, intending to inculcate a collective memory to a diverse society. We will focus on key events and essential components that shaped the Israeli society from the fifties till the present. We will also discuss the changes that the Israeli society experiences in its almost seventy years of existence and how it affects its politics and culture. Among the topics we will discuss issues such as immigration, economic transformation, political upheaval, religious Zionism and post-Zionism, privatization and Americanization, Holocaust increasing role in shaping Israel’s identity, diversity and multiculturalism, as well as the enduring conflict with the Palestinians and the Arab world.

Sur l’histoire et l’archéologie gréco-romaine

En cours depuis le 29 janvier 2018 

The Arch of Titus: Rome and the Menorah explores one of the most significant Roman monuments to survive from antiquity, from the perspectives of Roman, Jewish and later Christian history and art. The Arch of Titus  commemorates the destruction of Jerusalem by the emperor Titus in 70 CE, an event of pivotal importance for the history of the Roman Empire, of Judaism, of Christianity and of modern nationalism.
Together with your guide, Professor Steven Fine, you will examine ancient texts and artifacts, gaining skills as a historian as you explore the continuing significance of the Arch of Titus from antiquity to the very present.   Course members will accompany Professor Fine on virtual « fieldtrips » to museums and historical sites in Los Angeles and New York where you will « meet » curators, scholars and artists.  You will attend an academic colloquium and even « participate » in office hours.  Students will participate in the latest advancement in the study of the Arch – the restoration of its original colors.  You will learn how color was used in Roman antiquity and apply that knowledge to complete your own ‘color restoration’ of the Arch of Titus menorah relief.

Commence le 12 février 2018

Studying ancient – as well as medieval or modern – cities basically means telling local urban stories based on the reconstruction of changing landscapes through the centuries. Given the fragmentary nature of archaeological evidence, it is necessary to create new images that would give back the physical aspect of the urban landscape and that would bring it to life again. We are not just content with analyzing the many elements still visible of the ancient city. The connections between objects and architectures, visible and non visible buildings, which have been broken through time have to be rejoined, to acknowledge the elements that compose the urban landscape.
Landscape and its content are a very relevant and still vital part of any national cultural heritage. The course will introduce students to the way we have been reflecting on over the last twenty years and still are engaged with the study of the past of our cities, beginning from the most complex case in the ancient Mediterranean World: the core of Italy and of Roman Empire. On the other hand, knowledge means also preservation and defense of material remains and cultural memory.
“The Changing Landscape of Ancient Rome. Archeology and History of the Palatine Hill” presents to a large public the topographical lay-out of the most relevant part of the city (according the Greek and Roman Historians Rome was founded on the Palatine). Research developed on the Palatine since the end of last century by the team of Sapienza Classical Archaeologists opened a new phase in the urban archaeological investigation and in the scientific debate about the relation between archaeological features and literary tradition as well as the “correct use“ of both kind of evidence, key issues of wide archaeological and historical significance.

Commence le 19 février 2018

The objective of this course is to provide an overview of the culture of ancient Rome beginning about 1000 BCE and ending with the so-called « Fall of Rome ». We will look at some of the key people who played a role in Rome, from the time of the kings through the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire. We will also focus on the city of Rome itself, as well as Rome’s expansion through Italy, the Mediterranean, and beyond.

Commence le 19 février 2018

This is a survey of ancient Greek history from the Bronze Age to the death of Socrates in 399 BCE. Along with studying the most important events and personalities, we will consider broader issues such as political and cultural values and methods of historical interpretation.

Commence le 19 février 2018

Roman Architecture is a course for people who love to travel and want to discover the power of architecture to shape politics, society, and culture.

Partie I archivée
Inscriptions pour la partie II jusqu’au 28 février

 « La sculpture grecque d’Alexandre à Cléopâtre » est un MOOC, diffusé en deux parties, qui permet d’acquérir les connaissances indispensables à toute personne intéressée par l’histoire de l’art antique et l’archéologie classique. Le cours est tourné vers la maîtrise des outils de la recherche avec une référence constante aux documents sculptés.
La période retenue est celle de la plus grande extension géographique du monde grec : à la suite de la conquête par Alexandre d’une partie importante de l’Asie, l’horizon du monde grec s’est élargi et les trois siècles qui séparent la mort d’Alexandre en 323 av . J.-C. de la défaite de Cléopâtre et Antoine à Actium en 31 av. J.-C. voient se multiplier les échanges et se développer les royaumes qui se disputent la suprématie.
L’ensemble du cours est structuré par régions avec des cartes de situation. Il met en relation étroite les documents avec leur environnement. Des cartes animées servent d’appui et permettent de mémoriser une histoire de l’art ancrée dans ses temps et ses lieux. Les connaissances sur l’histoire de l’art antique, en particulier la sculpture, s’inscrivent ainsi dans un cadre géographique facile à mémoriser qui restitue les œuvres dans leur contexte. Le musée du Louvre et l’université de recherche Paris, Sciences et Lettres sont privilégiés dans la présentation des sculptures et le choix des intervenants.
À l’issue de ce MOOC, les participants maîtriseront les méthodes et les outils qui permettent un accès renouvelé et personnel aux œuvres et aux sites de l’Antiquité. Les apprenants auront un aperçu clair des processus de création et de diffusion nourri de l’avis des meilleurs experts du domaine.

Commence le 12 mars 2018

This course will provide a general outline of European history from Ancient times through 1500 AD, covering a variety of European historical periods and cultures, including Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Celtic, Frankish and others.

Sur la littérature et la philosophie gréco-latines 

En cours depuis le 11 janvier 2018

Explore what it means to be human today by studying what it meant to be a hero in ancient Greek times.
In this introduction to ancient Greek culture and literature, learners will experience, in English translation, some of the most beautiful works of ancient Greek literature and song-making spanning over a thousand years from the 8th century BCE through the 3rd century CE: the Homeric Iliad and Odyssey; tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides; songs of Sappho and Pindar; dialogues of Plato, and On Heroes by Philostratus. All of the resources are free and designed to be equally accessible and transformative for a wide audience.

Commence le 12 février 2018

What is philosophy?  How does it differ from science, religion, and other modes of human discourse?  This course traces the origins of philosophy in the Western tradition in the thinkers of Ancient Greece.  We begin with the Presocratic natural philosophers who were active in Ionia in the 6th century BCE and are also credited with being the first scientists.  Thales, Anaximander, and Anaximines made bold proposals about the ultimate constituents of reality, while Heraclitus insisted that there is an underlying order to the changing world.  Parmenides of Elea formulated a powerful objection to all these proposals, while later Greek theorists (such as Anaxagoras and the atomist Democritus) attempted to answer that objection.  In fifth-century Athens, Socrates insisted on the importance of the fundamental ethical question—“How shall I live?”—and his pupil, Plato, and Plato’s pupil, Aristotle, developed elaborate philosophical systems to explain the nature of reality, knowledge, and human happiness.  After the death of Aristotle, in the Hellenistic period, Epicureans and Stoics developed and transformed that earlier tradition.  We will study the major doctrines of all these thinkers.  Part I will cover Plato and his predecessors.  Part II will cover Aristotle and his successors.

Commence le 19 février 2018

What is philosophy?  How does it differ from science, religion, and other modes of human discourse?  This course traces the origins of philosophy in the Western tradition in the thinkers of Ancient Greece.  We begin with the Presocratic natural philosophers who were active in Ionia in the 6th century BCE and are also credited with being the first scientists.  Thales, Anaximander, and Anaximines made bold proposals about the ultimate constituents of reality, while Heraclitus insisted that there is an underlying order to the changing world.  Parmenides of Elea formulated a powerful objection to all these proposals, while later Greek theorists (such as Anaxagoras and the atomist Democritus) attempted to answer that objection.  In fifth-century Athens, Socrates insisted on the importance of the fundamental ethical question—“How shall I live?”—and his pupil, Plato, and Plato’s pupil, Aristotle, developed elaborate philosophical systems to explain the nature of reality, knowledge, and human happiness.  After the death of Aristotle, in the Hellenistic period, Epicureans and Stoics developed and transformed that earlier tradition.  We will study the major doctrines of all these thinkers.  Part I will cover Plato and his predecessors.  Part II will cover Aristotle and his successors.

Ce cours est terminé mais le contenu reste accessible

Le christianisme s’oppose-t-il à la raison philosophique ? Ce questionnement d’ordre général peut trouver une première réponse dans l’étude historique de la confrontation entre christianisme et philosophie dans l’Antiquité. Cette confrontation a joué un rôle très important dans la constitution de la doctrine chrétienne. Elle prend la forme d’une polémique entre les chrétiens et les philosophes, mais également d’un rapprochement, les chrétiens reprenant à la philosophie un grand nombre de concepts et de modes de raisonnement pour penser, exprimer et défendre leur foi. On verra ce qui oppose le christianisme et la philosophie comme deux voies d’accès concurrentes à la vérité, avant d’envisager différents aspects de la dette du christianisme à l’égard de la philosophie antique. On se demandera pour finir quel a été le rôle du christianisme dans l’histoire de la philosophie en tant que telle. Ce cours constitue une introduction au christianisme des origines ainsi qu’au monde intellectuel de l’Empire romain. Il permettra de comprendre comment se sont constitués les aspects centraux de la doctrine chrétienne. On évoquera aussi dans ce cadre les modalités pratiques de la production et de la transmission des idées dans l’Antiquité (papyrus, manuscrits) avec l’intervention de plusieurs spécialistes.

Ce cours est terminé mais le contenu reste accessible

 Homer’s account of the Trojan War in the Iliad explores the effects of warfare upon Greeks and Trojans alike. It illustrates not only the challenges that the combatants faced, but also the plight of innocent victims– women, children, and the elderly. Though the Iliad is often regarded as a kind of Greek national epic, Homer is remarkably even-handed in his treatment of the two sides, even seeming to favor the Trojans over the Greeks at times. He repeatedly emphasizes the horrors of war and his varied descriptions of deaths on the battlefield are unparalleled in both intensity and, paradoxically, poetic charm. The primary objective of warfare in the imaginary time period depicted by Homer is to attain personal glory through acts of individual prowess, with the good of the community seen as a secondary goal.
This course explores the idea that war is both universal and particular. The Vietnam War was not the same as the Iraq War. In every war, some things are the same, while some are different. Intense suffering and horrific acts are inevitable. However, the mode of fighting, the resources, the arms, the equipment, the treatment of prisoners, the command structure, and the ideology driving men and women to fight all differ.

Ce cours est terminé mais le contenu reste accessible

This philosophy course explores the origins of Western philosophy – a rich tapestry of ideas that began with the most noted ancient Greek and Roman philosophers.
By examining the work of these historic figures, students will attain a strong grasp of Western philosophy’s basic spirit. In doing so, they’ll cultivate deeper thinking abilities, explore noble values, and learn to contemplate the world around them in new ways.

Pour les jeunes enseignants et chercheurs 

Inscriptions jusqu’au 28 février

La dyslexie affecte des milliers d’étudiants dans les universités françaises. Ce handicap porte sur la facilité et la capacité des individus à lire et écrire, constituant ainsi un obstacle – mais pas du tout une limite – à leur capacité à apprendre en situation. L’enseignant de l’enseignement supérieur peut facilement participer à l’accompagnement du dyslexique, à condition de mieux connaître la nature de ce handicap et les différents moyens d’accompagnement de ce trouble.

Ce MOOC est terminé mais les cours seront accessibles jusqu’au 22 février 2018.

College Writing 2.1x is an introduction to academic writing for English Language Learners, focusing on essay development, grammatical correctness, and self-editing. The five-week course includes a review of basic grammar terminology and understanding; writing effective sentences and paragraphs; introductions and conclusions; strategies for writing longer texts; and thesis statements. The course materials will be offered via readings and videos. An optional course workbook, in ebook form, may be used for additional writing work. Students will participate in online discussions as well as peer review. Students will complete an essay for this part of the course.

Pour approfondir encore la question ou pour dénicher quelques MOOC plus proches de vos goûts personnels, voici les liens vers les pages d’accueil des plateformes que nous avons utilisées pour notre sélection :

Fun-Mooc : https://www.fun-mooc.fr/

EdX : https://www.edx.org/

My Mooc : https://www.my-mooc.com/fr/

Coursera : https://www.coursera.org/


Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse de messagerie ne sera pas publiée. Les champs obligatoires sont indiqués avec *

Ce site utilise Akismet pour réduire les indésirables. Apprenez comment les données de vos commentaires sont utilisées.